Filter Systems for a Wide Range of Cameras

 

system 100mm100mm System (100mm Filters)

Designed with just about every photographic combination in mind the 100mm system can be configured to hold up to four 100mm filters (our standard width) for unparalleled creative freedom.
We have a broad range of adaptor rings which enable you to use this system with an enormous range of lenses, and we can even make custom sizes if necessary.


 system rf75RF-75 System (75mm Filters)

Designed for use with compact digital cameras and rangefinder cameras.
The holder is also for large and medium format users who require a smaller, more compact filter system.
Compatible with some of the widest angle lenses.


 system sw150SW-150 Filter Holder (150mm Filters)

The SW-150 Filter Holder has been designed specifically to fit the Nikon 14-24mm lens.
The full range of LEE resin graduated and standard filters are available to order for the SW-150 but there is no Polariser or Big Stopper available for this system.
A separate "System Adaptor" allows you to fit the SW-150 onto an existing LEE Adaptor Ring enabling it to be fitted to other lenses.


Basic Metering (through the lens)

This can give very acceptable results with a high rate of success.

  1. metering-basic-01

    Establish your foreground base exposure:
    Set camera to manual. Point lens at foreground and take average centre weighted meter reading through the lens.
  2. Take a sky reading:
    Note the exposure difference between ground and sky.
  3. Select a ND Grad:
    Select the right ND grad to correct exposure difference to within 1 stop. For example, if the sky is 3 stops brighter than the ground, add a 0.6 ND (2 stop) grad filter to the sky only.
  4. Slide the filter into position:
    The grad transition line should be visible through the viewfinder or on the LCD screen. Stopping the lens down and using the depth of field preview can make the grad transition line easier to see.
  5. Shoot:
    Expose image using base exposure already established.

 Advanced Metering (hand-held spot meter)

A hand-held light meter gives more control and enables changing light to be monitored without repositioning the camera. The essence of this approach is: expose for the mid tones, allow for the shadows, filter the highlights.

  1. metering-advanced-01Establish your Base Exposure from mid-tones:
    Lock camera in place on tripod. Take readings from scene mid-tones.
  2. Allow for shadows:
    For detail to be retained in shadows they should be within 2 stops of base exposure. If necessary increase base exposure slightly.
  3. Take a reading from bright part of sky (not the sun):
    Note the exposure difference between ground and sky.
  4. Select a ND Grad:
    Select the right ND grad to correct exposure difference to within 1.5 stops. Anything more than +2 stops will be burnt out in final image.
  5. Slide the filter into position:
    The grad transition line should be visible through the viewfinder or on the LCD screen. Stopping the lens down and using the depth of field preview can make the grad transition line easier to see.
  6. Shoot:
    Expose image using base exposure already established.